• Issues 11 – 20

    Issue 11


    • Fred Buller reveals new ideas on when the first reels were used
    • Ron Swanson on Canadian and Norwegian carvers and modellers
    • How women were used in art to subvert fishing with romanticism
    • Plus: GEM Skues and his legacy to angling; news of tackle makers and what things are worth; Rescuing a lure or fly with weird devices; Book buying in the US; Auction news on reels and named tackle and much more


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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 12



    • The story of how Bernard Venables caught the world’s largest six-gilled shark
    • How wildlife carvers spread fish modelling throughout the US
    • Ernest Schwiebert recalls stories about the funniest fishing writer, Ed Zern
    • Plus: A detailed look at Hardy’s Fortuna Fly reel; South Bend lures and Lang’s auction; news of Bernard Venables death; What to look out for at Phillips auction; fishing videos; Robert Blakey the author; British bait mounts; ORCA’s show at Eindhoven, Holland and lots more


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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

     Issue 13



    • When Lee Wulff ‘s tuna helped the British Empire beat the Americans
    • 1840s silver reel, 1891 Perfect, 1870s glass lures up for auction
    • Pictures from your town: collecting fishing topography art
    • Plus: The US masters of fish carving; more tributes to Ed Zern;
      John Taverner’s book; auction news on art, books and tackle


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 14



    • Gold-enhanced models of the Mitchell 300 are among the very rarest of the French company’s output. We look at all the gold models and tell you how to identify them.
    • Shang Wheeler was one of the finest of all fish carvers. Many consider his work the equal of Elmer Crowell, whose decoys have sold for more than $800,000.We take a look at the wide range of Wheeler’s work.
    • Fred Buller examines the arguments for and against Dame Juliana Berners being the author of what many consider to be the first book in fishing.
    • Plus: Black bass were introduced into several UK lakes in the 1930s. In most cases, they disappeared — except in one lake. An early warning that Bernard Venables’ posthumous autobiography looks likely to sell out even before it’s published; the sale of a US man’s 4,000-book library; a new Aerialstyle centrepin that is beeing made by Hardy’s; the 1850s winch that sold for £11,000; an exhibition of Zane Grey’s taackle and memorabilia; the prints that pioneered fly fishing for salmon; what happended to angling sales in the wake of September 11, and lots, lots more.


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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 15



    • The tackle firm of William Cummins opened its first tackle business 15 years before Hardy’s and produced lavish catalogues that rivalled its near neighbour. We chart the rise and fall of the company.
    • Canada’s Cascapedia river has been a mecca for salmon anglers for more than 150 years. We look at the early days of fishing there, and the strange life of Perry Davis, who wrote the definitive book on the river.
    • Pictures of mail coaches and coaching inns by James Pollard are still familiar sights in English pubs. We look at his fishing pictures and sort out confusion on the dates of his work.
    • Plus: PLUS the US book sale that took $2million; a tribute to Jamie Maxtone Graham, the pioneer of British tackle collecting; the US east coast fish carvers; Orri Vigfusson, chairman of the North Atlantic Salmon Fund, pays tribute to Megan Boyd, one of the world’s great tyers of salmon flies, who died aged 86; the truth about the man who was the model for Quint in Peter Benchley’s Jaws; and much, much more.


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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 16



    • Everything you need to know about Mitchell’s great sea reel, the 498. We tell you what you need to know to spot the differences.
    • The high priest of dry fly fishing, Frederic Halford, changed his approach to tackle, the more he fished. Tony Hayter looks at the tackle that the great man used.
    • Clive Gammon was among the first westerners to fish the Kola Peninsula, way before it became popular as a destination for Atlantic salmon fishers. But his trip did not go to plan.
    • Plus: NOW up to 48 pages! PLUS: The angler as a figure of fun — prints that lampoon a fisherman’s lot; obituaries on Gregorio Fuentes, the man who inspired the character of Santiago, in Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, and Maurice Ingham, carp pioneer, who co-authored a book with Richard Walker and played a key role in developing the Mk IV carp rod; why tackle firm Hardy’s includes many items for smokers in its catalogues, and how to spot the rare ones; US fish carvers from the Chesapeake and Florida; the reference volumes that every book collector needs; the South African who makes kinetic fish carvings from rare woods, a whole page of auction and sales dates, plus lots, lots more.


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 17



    • How Alexander Wanless battled to get fly-fishing with a fixed-spool accepted, and the ideas that this pioneering writer tried to popularise.
    • The very earliest days of postcards, and how they were the equivalent of text messaging at the start of the 1900s.
    • A superb new book on Frederic Halford looks set to become the definitive work on the man described as the the high priest of dry fly fishing.
    • Plus: PLUS Fears on the closure of Izaak Walton’s cottage; a rod that sold for £20,000; fears that the US may have no national tackle auctions; doubts over flies sold as the work on Megan Boyd; a classic new Aerial bearing Fred J Taylor’s name; collecting catalogues; the New York drinking bar that had its own fishing club (for a very short while); plus much, much more


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 18



    • A superb new book traces the history of fly fishing from Roman times to the present day, and it confounds much of the accepted wisdom on materials and creators.
    • A cottage once owned by Izaak Walton, which has been a museum for almost 80 years, faces closure because the council that runs it cannot afford its upkeep.
    • The Mitchell 498 was once the reel of choice for thousands of surf casters. We look at the many versions of the reel, including some very rare ones.
    • Plus: US auction house Langs set for one final sale.


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 19



    • Tyrell Morgan boasted an incredible record of catching salmon, and once caught 13 from a single pool. He was a strict purist, only fishing upstream — with worms.
    • Alf Dean’s 2,664 lb great white shark world record still stands. That may one day be beaten, but surely nobody will ever come close to Dean’s record for more than 100 great whites.
    • We review The Fly, a book that is bound to become a classic. It took Andrew Herd 12 years of research to compile the information on not just the flies but lines, rods, reels and their development.
    • Plus: The Steve Abel story. Finding out more about tackle maker David Foster


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 20



    • As dry-fly fishing became more popular, tackle firms explored some novel ways to contain the floatant. We look at how firms like Hardy’s approached the challenge.
    • Tackle or cast winders were once commonplace for holding a ready-made rig. They have been around since the late 1700s, and it’s possible to identify their age by looking at certain features.
    • Raphael Tuck issued thousands of series of postcards. We look at some of the specialist series that Tuck’s issued on the subject of angling.


    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)