• Czechs to take cormorants off protected species list

    by  • November 26, 2012 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    Czechoslovakia is taking the cormorant off its list of specially protected species April 1 next year. Its environment minister Tomas Chalupa has signed a directive that will allow them to be shot if they cause damage. A statement said that the European cormorant population was not at an endangered level, and the Environment Ministry considered its current protection level unnecessary. “Cormorants will still be protected, as all birds in the Czech Republic and the whole European Union under the respective laws and directives, but they will not be included in the species most threatened with extinction,” Chalupa said. There’s a financial reason behind this. The state pays tens of millions of crowns a year to fishermen in compensation for the extensive damage they cause to fish populations and trees. After the new directive takes effect, the Czech state will no longer cover the damage that they cause. The bird was listed among specially protected species at the turn of the 1980s when their populations were very low.  Cormorants only appeared in Czechoslovakia during their spring and autumn migration, and almost no cormorants nested there. Nowadays, about 600 nest in the Czech Republic, and thousands stop during their spring and autumn migration. Another 8000 to 10,000 cormorants annually winter there. Other European countries to regulate cormorant populations include Austria, Germany and Switzerland.

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    Editor and publisher of Classic Angling magazine. Founder member of UK Angling Writers' Association and current chairman. Former winner of Writer of the Year. I wrote a weekly angling column for The Independent for 23 years, having previously written columns for The Guardian and Sunday Mirror. If it swims, I'll fish for it: marlin or mackerel, trout or tench, salmon or snook. I've written several books on fishing, from one for the Duke of Edinburgh's award to the notorious Catchmore Sharks (don't look at the pictures) and Bob Nudd's autobiography, How to be the World's Best Fisherman. I love exotic travel for fishing (been to Mongolia and Ecuador, the Great Barrier Reef and Arunachal Pradesh) and wish I could afford to do such trips more often. My favourite fish? Anything with fins, though I have a special love for mahseer, and I'm chairman of The Mahseer Trust.

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