• Issues 51 – 60

    Issue 51


    • BATTLING FOR BRISTOL BAY SALMON Three companies have joined forces to create a limited-edition fly outfit and raise money for those opposing a mining development that could wreck Alaska’s legendary run of salmon.
    • PRE-WAR BITE ALARM COMES TO LIGHT For most carp anglers today, an electronic alarm is as essential as a rod and reel. Electronica lover John Andrews thought that these dated back to the early 1950s. But he has discovered a much earlier one.
    • HOW COL HARDING’S CLASSIC CAME ABOUT Judith Head finds plenty of fascinating stories in a mass of material relating to one of the best and most carefully considered books on fly fishing, The Fly Fisher and the Trout’s Point of View.
    • Plus: Look here for all the forthcoming auctions, shows and tackle fairs, wherever they are in the world.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 52


    • THE 30LB PIKE BEHIND THE STORY One of the finest stories in Fred Buller’s Pike and the Pike Angler is the tale of how the Rev Tom Secombe Gray caught a 30lb pike from the river Wye in 1905.
    • CROSSMAN, THE SPIRITUAL ARTIST Diane K Inman examines the work of Rod Crossman, an Indiana artist who is one of 10 featured in a new book looking at modern US artists, the motivation and inspiration behind their painting.
    • IN THE KINGDOM OF GENGHIS Of all the places he has visited, Keith Elliott says the one that left the most lasting impression was a pioneering trip after the world’s largest salmonid in Outer Mongolia.
    • Plus: Scottish trout thrived in a Natal river after the Zulu War ended. We look at the story of their introduction. Our eBay spot looks at the Tulsa Wiggler from Goble of Oklahoma. It may well have been made in Germany.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 53


    • A SMALL SUCCESS The How to Catch Them series of books may have been small in size, but they sold more than 700,000 copies. Eddie Chambers, author of a new book about the 45 books in the range, looks at how they came about and what collectors need to know.
    • THE MAN WHO PULLS YOU UNDERWATER Keith Elliott admires a book featuring the fish, both freshwater and sea, painted by UK artist David Miller, whose willingness to share the water with his subjects results in incredibly lifelike art.
    • A COLLECTOR’S DREAM Keith Elliott revels in the exeptional quality offered by probably the finest collection of British tackle and lures to come up for auction.
    • Plus: All the forthcoming auctions, shows and tackle fairs, wherever they are in the world.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 54


    • The fashion company Chanel is now making a fishing kit, complete with branded flies and boots.
    • Orvis is cutting the price of its showpiece trip to fish for Chile’s salmon and trout by up to $14,000.
    • Our eBay spot looks at the background to a Pezon et Michel cane rod that sold for $2750.
    • A brace of Wadham creels are among the highlights at Bonhams’ annual riverside auction in Henley.
    • You can now buy a coffin that can be personalised with pictures of your favourite fishing locations.
    • A charitable trust is being set up to protect dwindling stocks of mahseer, the legendary Indian fish.
    • A British angler has completed the unique feat of achieving royal slams in billfish, shark and tuna.
    • Clive Gammon talks about how three Frenchmen spoilt his dreams of a sea-going taimen.
    • Neil Freeman looks at hooks and fish spears used by the Inuit people in their battle for survival.
    • John Bailey believes mahseer far bigger than the 120lb world record exist, and he recounts the story of one.
    • Judith Head solves a bookish mystery: who was the author who called himself Martin Pescador?
    • Our books pages cover everything from a new work on Fin-Nor to one giant Atlantic salmon.
    • Jim Bazley was the only man to win the All-England Championships twice. He may be the best match fisherman of all.
    • A comprehensive bibliography of Fred J Taylor starts a new series on writers and their books.
    • In our letters pages a reader wants help to find out more about an old fishing club.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


    Issue 55


    • We tend to assume there is only one Spey cast. But Graham Booth uncovers the fact that there are two distinct casts – and the classic one comes from another river entirely.
    • Jack Hargreave’s Out of Town was compulsive watching for more than 20 years. Graham Mole tells his memories of the countryman.
    • A pot-bellied leather creel that its owner bought for just £1 has sold for £10,000 at Bonham’s auction.
    • A seat to commemorate Skues was moved after being dismissed as “inconsequential”. But it could yet return to its old home.
    • It’s arguably the best fishing club in the world. And you can’t just join because you have the $600,000 entry fee.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 56


    • John Enright’s Castleconnell shop in County Limerick was once world famous, not only for its greenheart rods but also for its proprietor’s oridugious casting ability.
    • The goliath tigerfish is probably the most fearsome freshwater fish, and it’s a devil to catch as well. It is only found in the Congo river, a place where only the very brave or very foolish fear to tread.
    • Frank Mundus, the man who was the inspiration for Captain Quint in Jaws, has died aged 82.
    • The Red River at Lockport, Manitoba, is one of the world’s most prolific fisheries, especially for channel cats.
    • A Tlingit salmon basket has just sold for $55,000. We look at its history, its importance to the tribe and the people who made it.
    • Four new Zippo fishing lighters have just been created by marine artist Dr Guy Harvey. We examine the hisory of the Zippo.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 57


    • With teeth like a vampire, goliath tigerfish are the world’s most frightening freshwater fish. They inhabit the Congo river, a place only the very brave dare to visit. But Simon Channing headed for the Democratic Republic of Congo after the fish from hell.
    • Dennis Pye was one of the most successful pike anglers of all time. But what happened to the cased pike that lived in his fish-and-chip shop?
    • The man who caught the world-record marlin, Alfred Glassell, has died. The 1560lb fish he took in 1953 still holds the record.
    • Graham Turner, author of the best book on collecting, has re-written his 1989 work.  A new 700-page edition will be published soon.
    • An oddball Howban fixed-spool was one of several reels to sell well at Mullock’s in the face of global financial meltdown.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 58


    • The man with the pipe is FA Michell-Hedges: adventurer, writer, explorer and possibly the worst liar to pick up a fishing rod. We try to sort face fromm fiction in a life story that culminated in him claiming discovery of Indiana Jones’ Crystal Skull.
    • The jewel in every Mitchell collector’s crown: an original first Mitchell. We tell you exactly how to identify a genuine one from a ‘Frankenstein’.
    • The sight of an auctioneer taking bids at a live sale could become a thing of the past if Lang’s decision to switch to an online auction proves a success.
    • Ghillie Gregor Mackenzie fished with David Niven and Sir Charles Forte. Graham Mole, who wrote Gregor’s biography, recalls his memories of the man.
    • John Wilson has arguably been the most watched angler in Europe. We review his autobiography, as well as books by Richard Walker and others.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 59


    • Richard Walker is the only angler to choose the records on Desert Island Discs. Keith Armishaw takes a look at the many other television and radio appearances that Walker made, many of which have since been lost in the mists of time.
    • Twenty years on, John Bailey recalls the first great adventure of his life: a memorable trip to the river Ganges to make a film on mahseer called Casting for Gold.
    • Strange-looking robot fish have been designed to search the sea for pollution. And cyberfish could soon be in an aquarium near you…
    • A lunmp of rock in Africa’s Lake Victoria has nearly caused a war between two nations. And at the heart of it is a battle for the rights to plunder the lake’s dwindling Nike perch stocks.
    • It’s not easy to spot the minute differences that make an Allcock Aerial special. But the early stampings and engravings can give valuable clues.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 60


    • This 2000lb great white represents one of angling’s greatest feats: catching the huge fish from the shore. We look at the life and times of Bill Selkirk, the man who did so not once, but on several occasions.
    • Richard Walker clainmed that we was not much of a musician. But when he appeared on the BBC radio programme Desert Island Discs, he had a chancee to air his trenchant views and musical leanings.
    • John Bailey has a late-night trawl through his photographs and expresses dissatisfacton that he’s never really achieved the shots he wanted.
    • How to recognise a second version of the Mitchell that became the 300.
    • An invitation to former US vice-president Dick Cheney has resulted in several leading members of the American Museum of Fly Fishing resigning.
    • A 200lb Nike perch was the largest fish ever carved by the Tully family. We review a book on the great fish carvings and carvers.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)