• Issues 61 – 70

    Issue 61


    • This Ustonson reel may be the most important one ever seen, believes author Graham Turner, because it confounds all that we believed about the birth of multiplying reels and the American influence on their development. Here, he explains why.
    • The boilie, once thought to have been the invention of British anglers, goes right back to the early 1900s and German fisherman, we reveal.
    • The Romans introduced carp to Britain 2000 years ago. Could fish from that original wild strain still exist? Nigel Hudson tells of his quest.
    • Pike anglers were stunned to read about a 63lb 14oz pike, 8lb above the record, from Poland. But predator experts have some doubts about the fish.
    • A huge largemouth bass breaks the world record. But it won’t beat a record that has stood for 77 years. Keith Elliott explains why.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 62


    • The alligator gar is one of the most awe-inspiraing fish in the wolrd. Keith Elliott tells of his trip into rural Texas to fish for a prehistoric creature that looks as if it should have died out more than 150 million years ago.
    • A huge 48lb rainbow trout was caught at night by an angler whose brother held the previous record.
    • Nigel Hudson tells how his 20-year quest to catch a true wild carp in the British Isles was finally rewarded in a tiny mountain lake.
    • Theodore Gordon was the founding farther of Catskills fly tying. But how did the succession proceed to today’s tyers?
    • An Allcock Rollerback set a record for the marque when it sold for £8000 at Angling Auctions in London.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 63


    • The captor of this huge striped bass should have won great acclaim and respect for his world record. Instead, he received hate mail and death threats. We tell the story of how Al McReynolds caught his 78lb 8oz fish.
    • He was a casting champion and a brilliant catcher of spectacularly large fish. We look at the talents of FWK Wallis, whose skills with a centrepin reel are legendary.
    • Jack Gartside, the author and ace fly tyer, has died aged 66. Friends have fondly described him as “the original trout bum”.
    • The revelation that the hair-rig is far older than we believed has taken a new twist with the discovery of a 1965 article in a French magazine detailing how to use it for catching big tench.
    • Master swindler Bernie Madoff may have been worth billions at one time, but he didn’t spend much of his fortune on decent tackle.
    • Leaping carp are an internet hit. But they could cost local communities millions and prove and environmental disaster.
    • The man who was the underbidder on that famous Ustonson brass multiplying reel gives his opinion on its age and pedigree.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 64


    • It is one of angling’s most extraordinary stories: how the New Zealand “beech mast” attracts millions of mice, and how those mice in turn get snapped up by huge trout. Carl McNeil, who has made a film of the vent called Once in a Blue Moon, tells the story.
    • Insects like these are highly collectable but can be bought very cheaply, says Neil Freeman. But did the Victorian anglers readlly use them for trout fishing?
    • The arapaima is one of the world’s largest freshwater fish, and this near-300lb monster, caught from the Amazon, has set a world record for Jakub Vagner.
    • This party caught over 3000 fish in a week. They were led by the great FWK Wallis.
    • A UK company has been swamped with worldwide demand for its top-of-the-range centrepins.
    • We continue the story of Al MacReyolds’ record striped bass by trying to solve the mystery of how many casts were made of the fish.
    • The rod being held by historian Fred Buller is the world’s first to be made in carbon-fibre. We tell of Hardy’s role in its genesis.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 65


    • Could this goonch really be a maneater? We look at the tales and try to learn more about India’s largest (and ugliest) freshwater fish.
    • Reels like these are being openly advertised online by Indian companies offering to duplicated classic marques. We investigate the trade.
    • Karl Whie is looking for a new home for his vast tackle collection – and he’s in a race against the clock.
    • Daytona seafront in Florida will offer readers the chance for sun, sea and a visit to one of the year’s biggest classic tackle shows.
    • A reel designed by Ettore Bugatti could be the most valuable item of modern tackle.
    • We tend to think of the bait-dropper as a modern device, but All Our Yesterdays uncovers one that was invented back in 1894.
    • This is the actual rod and reel on which Zane Grey caught a record blue marlin of 1040lb fromm Tahiti in 1931 – or was it?

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 66


    • It was once the most successful of all charter boats operating from British ports. Now it lies rusting, fit only for scrap. We trace the life and times of Our Unity and its colourful crew.
    • Simon Channing heads to Papua New Guinea, where cannibalism took place until very recently, to fish for the toughest freshwater fish of all – the black bass.
    • A man who shared in this catch of porbeagle sharks was also the top man at catching big roach on a Devon river.
    • Charter skippers wince if they see an angler on their boat with a banana. But what’s behind the superstition?
    • Two of the very rarest Mitchells, a Global and a Silver, have turned up out of the blue in Norway.
    • He was arguably the finest taxidermist of all. Fred Buller tells his memories of watching William Griggs go about his work.
    • Ustonson is the most famous name in early fishing tackle. We add some valuable fresh information and dates to what is known about the firm, started in the 1760s.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 67


    • Dendy Sadler is one of the most popular Victorian artists. On the eve of a new book on angling in British art, we look at some of Sadler’s most famous works – his fishing monks.
    • Buying this reel could really hurt your wallet – because it’s fake. Top collector Roger Still tells you what to look for, to make sure you don’t get duped.
    • A famous river crossing on the river Dove, mentioned in Walton’s The Compleat Angler has falled victim to the health and safety brigade.
    • Anglers with an interest in Mitchell reels have been warned to be on the lookout for fake first-version 300s.
    • A court ruling could threaten all mahseer fishing in India and put the fate of the endangered fish in jeopardy. We try to unravel what it means for anglers planning to fish there.
    • Top guitarist Paul Brett, a keen angler, has made a DVD about the life and times of Izaak Walton, author of The Compleat Angler.
    • This year marks the centenary of a fierce competition between two of the top US luremakers.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 68


    • This walleye has just been reinstated by the Fresh Water Hall of Fame as the official world record. But did it really weigh the 25lb that its captor claimed? We look at the evidence that resulted in its reinstatement.
    • This superb reservoir packed with salmon flies, formerly the property of AHE Wood, pioneer of using a floating line for salmon, has just been sold for a hefty £8200 at Angling Auctions.
    • A new book this month covers a previously unconsidered topic: the ‘baby’ reels by French maker Mitchell.
    • Steve Wozniak, the first man to catch 1000 species of fish, tells how he did it and what he plans to do next.
    • A new series looks at the early life and times of the US tackle pionee John Conroy.
    • Top US bookseller Judith Bowman, who used the Ernest Briggs picture as her inspiration, is to retire.
    • This set comprising the first five editions of The Compleat Angler has just been sold at auction.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 69


    • Lord Nelson, who led the English fleet to victory over the French and Spanish navies at the battle of Trafalgar, was a keen angler, we reveal.
    • Norfolk pike expert Dennis Pye was prone to exagerrating the size of the fish that he caught, claims Geoffrey Bucknall.
    • These rare bird pelts were stolen from the Natural History Museum by one of the most highly rated salmon fly tyers.
    • Companies running fishing trips to the Seychelles have been warned to stay away because of piracy fears.
    • Moves are afoot to wipe out all trout from South Africa, because they are considered ‘alien species’.
    • Tommy Edwards was arguably the finest caster ever. One of his ‘pupils’ recalls the great man.
    • We take a look at the place in Canada where chinook salmon can we caught.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 70


    • Tommy Bradshaw was an extraordinary man: carver, painter, fly-tyer and top fisherman. We look at the life and times of a man who moved from England to conquer Canada.
    • This famous picture from Mr Crabtree Goes Fishing by Bernard Venables was sold remarkably cheaply at an auction in Scotland. The sale also saw another Venables picture from the same book on offer.
    • Don Tyson, whose generosity enabled the IGFA to build its own museum and HQ in Florida, had died aged 80.
    • Hardy’s is reviving the famed Hardy Brothers name as it at last pays heed to its rich heritage. The box above, with hand-tied flies, is one of the first products under its elite range.
    • The unusual sport of tuna-tossing has been forced to switch to using plastic fish.
    • A collector tells how he was deceived into buying fake Hardy reels by an unscrupulous dealer.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)