• Issues 71 – current

    Issue 71


    • Roy Rogers, the “king of the cowboys”, was a very keen angler who grabbed every opportunity that he could in his busy film and appearances schedule to go fishing.
    • Flies with a spinning vane would be very suspect now, but they were once very popular. Now they have regained their popularity – with collectors.
    • The mahseer, said to weigh 130lb, could become a new record. But it has stirred up a storm of controversey.
    • It seems the most unlikely fishing vessel. But this submarine was used to catch fish on lines – while it was actually underwater.
    • Billy Pate, one the the world’s foremost saltwater fly anglers and a man who has set a host of big-game records, has died at the age of 81.
    • Tarpon anglers have a treat in store, with two very different books about the silver king just out. Our review pages include a new work on the history of carp fishing.
    • We tell the story of Yuck Meldrum, one the finest of all fish carvers.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 72


    • Nobody believed that carp could be caught in winter until Gerry Savage, pictured, proved them wrong. Fishing with Fred Wilton, he landed more than 70 in snow and ice.
    • The author Ref Quill lived in this wonderful Thames-side house. David Solomon talks about his memories of fishing in James Englefield’s back garden.
    • This all-silver bait from the 1800s was probably made by an English jeweller. It comes up for auction at Mullock’s next sale.
    • Steelhead like this are one of the appeals of fishing in British Columbia, says Roger Still.
    • The notorious Purple Gang were regulars at Vernier’s Hotel in Michigan. Did carver Yuck Meldrum know the gang?
    • There’s the chance to win a $2m top prize in a tagged fishing contest – but you’ve probably got a better chance of breaking the marlin record in your local river.
    • The company that owns Tatler Reels, which broke several British and world records, has put the famous brand up for sale.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 73


    • Alfred Jardine was the greatest pike fisher of his generation, perhaps of all time. We take a look at this contraversial man and dispel some of the myths.
    • These are the fly rods of Col Oborn, a self-taught maker whose popular split-cane fly rods were made from a shed in his back garden in an English village.
    • Reuben Heaton, one of the great names in fishing tackle, is about to start making reels again. It’s 60 years since the company made its last fly reel.
    • This huge striped bass of nearly 82lb breaks the world record – but the captor will not put in a claim.
    • Can you be sure a fly said to be the work of a certain maker is actually his creation? In many cases, you can’t trust the experts.
    • John Baileye reveals that he is about the create a new series of Mr Crabtree. He discusses his fears of taking on the Venables icon.
    • Many think that the Malloch or Illingworth reels were the first fixed-spools, but actually it was an American reel.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 74


    • Fans bearing images of fishing and fishermen are surprisingly rare. Hélène Alexander Adda, director of the London-based Fan Museum, takes a look at social history reflected in fans and at some early European fans bearing fishing images.
    • This elderly woman isn’t just posing for a picture: she’s playing an 850lb marlin. Not bad for a great-grandmother of 85, out on her very first big-game fishing trip…
    • This rod, which sold for a mighty $6100 a Lang’s last auction, was made by Pinky Gillum, who refused to sell to people he considered unsportsmanlike.
    • Detective work by David Solomon uncovers the very spot on the Avon that Roderick Haig-Brown wrote about spotting a big pike in A River Never Sleeps.
    • This huge Nile perch is one of the biggest ever caught from the river that gave the fish its name. All Our Yesterdays tells the story.
    • John Bailey reveals details about the television series he is about to do, based on the book of Mr Crabtree Goes Fishing.
    • This handsome reel is a one-off. It’s the only titanium reel ever made by Steve Abel, and it came up for sale on eBay.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 75


    • Dennis Pye always claimed that his pike weighed 34lb. But photographic evidence that has just come to light proved that it was exactly the same fish caught two days earlier by Pye’s protoge Derrick Amiss – at a weight of 24lb.
    • To many, he was the greatest golfer of all. But not many know that Arnold Palmer also put his name to a range of fishing reels that were among the nastiest and most unreliable Japanese reels ever produced.
    • Bookseller Steve Starrantino is setting up a fishing auction in the US to meet what he sees as a latent demand for a return to live sales. Lang’s, the major player, quit live auctions three years ago.
    • This wonderful picture of Joan Wulff in a 1952 casting championship is from a new book on Florida fishing legends and pioneers.
    • This very early Hardy Perfect sold for a hefty £10,000 at Bonhams auction, while a Farlow’s Fly wallet made £7500 at the same sale.
    • Heavyweight collector John Fahey is offering art, books, cased fish and rods for sale.
    • George Kelson is revered as the author of The Salmon Fly. But he was also a terrible plagiarist, writes Geoffrey Bucknall.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 76


    • This 1496lb tuna has held the world record since 1979. We look at the story of Ken Fraser, a one-time welder, and the day that he caught a fish that may never be surpassed on rod and line.
    • Keith Elliott relates his adventures on a pioneering trip to Arunachal Pradesh 16 years ago, and what drew him back.
    • Robin Harris, the only man to win the world angling championships and the UK National title, has died at the age of 76.
    • Spain’s river Ebro could soon be a thing of the past. The Spanish government is looking at ways of removing all invasive species like carp, catfish and even rainbow trout from its waters.
    • The extraordinary story of war hero Col Mike Ansell, who caught over 300 salmon despite being totally blind.
    • Many of the ‘advances’ in fly-tying like hairwings are actually more than a century older.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 77


    • Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Scout movement, was an avid angler who fished whenever and wherever he got the chance. We look at the early part of his life, and how it would go on to play a major influence in the creation of Scouting.
    • Otto Zwarg left a career in dentistry to move to the US and start a reel-making business. We review the first book to cover the famed maker’s life and times.
    • The Seamaster, made in Florida by Captain Bob McChristian, is one of the rarest and most prized threadlines, says Ben Wright, who calls it “the Rolls-Royce of fixed-spool reels”.
    • Old magazines are a treasure trove of information, says Mark Wintle, who has compiled a list of the UK magazines published since the 1850s.
    • Only two first-edition copies are known of this book – and one will be coming up for sale at Bonhams in London later this month.
    • Tackle owned by Billy Pate, one of the pioneers of saltwater fly fishing, is coming up for sale.
    • Writer and tackle advisor Des Taylor is heading a campaign to get more people fishing rivers.

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    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)


     

    Issue 78


    • Clive Gammon, probably the finest fishing travel writer of modern times, has died aged 73. He took this near-70lb taimen on the Mongolian border.
    • This photograph is of Sir Winston Churchill. The picture, and a rod used by the former British prime minister, turned up unexpectedly in a Devon bookshop.
    • Several record fish including an 182lb tarpon, caught by the famed Billy Pate, were on offer at a Florida auction of his tackle and memorabilia.
    • Big mahseer may never be caught again on the famous stretches of India’s river Cauvery.
    • The first carp to be landed over 100lb has been caught from a purpose-built fishery in Hungary.
    • The second part of our feature on Lord Baden-Powell discusses his fishing involvement after he left the army.

    Order a copy

    £6 (UK and Northern Ireland), £8 (Europe), £9 (Rest of the world)